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Sometimes i'll post personal things when you see AVB. You can find my personal website at angelavictoriabartlett.com
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mediumaevum:

This insanely gorgeous home has an amazing story behind it.

Fonthill was the home of the American archeologist and tile maker Henry Chapman Mercer, in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Built between 1908 and 1912, it is an early example of poured-in-place concrete and features 44 rooms, over 200 windows, 18 fireplaces and 10 bathrooms. The interior was originally painted in pastel colors, but age and sunlight have all but eradicated any hint of the former hues. It contains much built-in furniture and is embellished with decorative tiles that Mercer made at the height of the Arts and Crafts movement. It is filled with an extensive collection of ceramics embedded in the concrete of the house, as well as other artifacts from his world travels, including cuneiform tablets discovered in Mesopotamia dating back to over 2300 BCE. The home also contains around 1,000 prints from Mercer’s extensive collection, as well as over six thousand books, almost all of which were annotated by Mercer himself.

More images (by Karl Graf)
mediumaevum:

This insanely gorgeous home has an amazing story behind it.

Fonthill was the home of the American archeologist and tile maker Henry Chapman Mercer, in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Built between 1908 and 1912, it is an early example of poured-in-place concrete and features 44 rooms, over 200 windows, 18 fireplaces and 10 bathrooms. The interior was originally painted in pastel colors, but age and sunlight have all but eradicated any hint of the former hues. It contains much built-in furniture and is embellished with decorative tiles that Mercer made at the height of the Arts and Crafts movement. It is filled with an extensive collection of ceramics embedded in the concrete of the house, as well as other artifacts from his world travels, including cuneiform tablets discovered in Mesopotamia dating back to over 2300 BCE. The home also contains around 1,000 prints from Mercer’s extensive collection, as well as over six thousand books, almost all of which were annotated by Mercer himself.

More images (by Karl Graf)
mediumaevum:

This insanely gorgeous home has an amazing story behind it.

Fonthill was the home of the American archeologist and tile maker Henry Chapman Mercer, in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Built between 1908 and 1912, it is an early example of poured-in-place concrete and features 44 rooms, over 200 windows, 18 fireplaces and 10 bathrooms. The interior was originally painted in pastel colors, but age and sunlight have all but eradicated any hint of the former hues. It contains much built-in furniture and is embellished with decorative tiles that Mercer made at the height of the Arts and Crafts movement. It is filled with an extensive collection of ceramics embedded in the concrete of the house, as well as other artifacts from his world travels, including cuneiform tablets discovered in Mesopotamia dating back to over 2300 BCE. The home also contains around 1,000 prints from Mercer’s extensive collection, as well as over six thousand books, almost all of which were annotated by Mercer himself.

More images (by Karl Graf)
mediumaevum:

This insanely gorgeous home has an amazing story behind it.

Fonthill was the home of the American archeologist and tile maker Henry Chapman Mercer, in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Built between 1908 and 1912, it is an early example of poured-in-place concrete and features 44 rooms, over 200 windows, 18 fireplaces and 10 bathrooms. The interior was originally painted in pastel colors, but age and sunlight have all but eradicated any hint of the former hues. It contains much built-in furniture and is embellished with decorative tiles that Mercer made at the height of the Arts and Crafts movement. It is filled with an extensive collection of ceramics embedded in the concrete of the house, as well as other artifacts from his world travels, including cuneiform tablets discovered in Mesopotamia dating back to over 2300 BCE. The home also contains around 1,000 prints from Mercer’s extensive collection, as well as over six thousand books, almost all of which were annotated by Mercer himself.

More images (by Karl Graf)
mediumaevum:

This insanely gorgeous home has an amazing story behind it.

Fonthill was the home of the American archeologist and tile maker Henry Chapman Mercer, in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Built between 1908 and 1912, it is an early example of poured-in-place concrete and features 44 rooms, over 200 windows, 18 fireplaces and 10 bathrooms. The interior was originally painted in pastel colors, but age and sunlight have all but eradicated any hint of the former hues. It contains much built-in furniture and is embellished with decorative tiles that Mercer made at the height of the Arts and Crafts movement. It is filled with an extensive collection of ceramics embedded in the concrete of the house, as well as other artifacts from his world travels, including cuneiform tablets discovered in Mesopotamia dating back to over 2300 BCE. The home also contains around 1,000 prints from Mercer’s extensive collection, as well as over six thousand books, almost all of which were annotated by Mercer himself.

More images (by Karl Graf)
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casabet64:

Eduardo Naranjo
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casabet64:

EDUARDO NARANJO
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arpeggia:

Paintings by Eduardo Naranjo
La imagen de los tiempos perdidos, 1975, oil on canvas, 130.5 x 97.5 cm
Espacio para un sueño, 1975, oil on canvas, 190 x 168 cm
arpeggia:

Paintings by Eduardo Naranjo
La imagen de los tiempos perdidos, 1975, oil on canvas, 130.5 x 97.5 cm
Espacio para un sueño, 1975, oil on canvas, 190 x 168 cm
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smartpeopleposting:

The Glorious Jewel Scarab and the physics of light
Also known as Glorious beetle and Glorious scarab, Chrysina gloriosa (Coleoptera - Scarabaeidae), is an unmistakable beetle found in the US (western Texas, New Mexico, southeast Arizona), and Mexico (Chihuahua and Sonora) [1].
The adults reach 25 to 28 mm long and are bright green with silver stripes on the elytra. However, this beetle (and several other species of beetle in the family Scarabaeidae), actually shine brighter than they appear, the result of a light trick that only a few animals on the planet can accomplish.
The fact is that hidden within the microstructure of the beetle’s exoskeleton there are helical twists and turns that enable certain species of scarabs the rare ability to create and reflect circularly polarized light. While many animals can create and even see linearly polarized light, there are very few examples of the creation of circularly polarized light in nature, and Chrysina gloriosa, a particularly adorable species of scarab, is one of those special few [2]. 
Further readings:
Brady and Cummings (2010), Differential response to circularly polarized light by the jewel scarab beetle Chrysina gloriosa. The American Naturalist, Vol. 175, No. 5, May 2010.
Blahó et al. (2012). No evidence for behavioral responses to circularly polarized light in four scarab beetle species with circularly polarizing exocuticle. Physiology & Behavior, Volume 105, Issue 4, 28 February 2012, Pages 1067–1075.
Perception of Polarized Light.
Photo credit: Chrysina gloriosa from Kohl’s Ranch, Tonto National Forest, Gila Co., Arizona, 5320 ft. elev. by ©Carla Kishinami [Top] - [Bottom] 
smartpeopleposting:

The Glorious Jewel Scarab and the physics of light
Also known as Glorious beetle and Glorious scarab, Chrysina gloriosa (Coleoptera - Scarabaeidae), is an unmistakable beetle found in the US (western Texas, New Mexico, southeast Arizona), and Mexico (Chihuahua and Sonora) [1].
The adults reach 25 to 28 mm long and are bright green with silver stripes on the elytra. However, this beetle (and several other species of beetle in the family Scarabaeidae), actually shine brighter than they appear, the result of a light trick that only a few animals on the planet can accomplish.
The fact is that hidden within the microstructure of the beetle’s exoskeleton there are helical twists and turns that enable certain species of scarabs the rare ability to create and reflect circularly polarized light. While many animals can create and even see linearly polarized light, there are very few examples of the creation of circularly polarized light in nature, and Chrysina gloriosa, a particularly adorable species of scarab, is one of those special few [2]. 
Further readings:
Brady and Cummings (2010), Differential response to circularly polarized light by the jewel scarab beetle Chrysina gloriosa. The American Naturalist, Vol. 175, No. 5, May 2010.
Blahó et al. (2012). No evidence for behavioral responses to circularly polarized light in four scarab beetle species with circularly polarizing exocuticle. Physiology & Behavior, Volume 105, Issue 4, 28 February 2012, Pages 1067–1075.
Perception of Polarized Light.
Photo credit: Chrysina gloriosa from Kohl’s Ranch, Tonto National Forest, Gila Co., Arizona, 5320 ft. elev. by ©Carla Kishinami [Top] - [Bottom] 
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mpdrolet:

Leila & Damien de Blinkk
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peachpup:

google image results for “fire escape garden”
peachpup:

google image results for “fire escape garden”
peachpup:

google image results for “fire escape garden”
peachpup:

google image results for “fire escape garden”
peachpup:

google image results for “fire escape garden”
peachpup:

google image results for “fire escape garden”
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red-lipstick:

Bezt (one half of Etam Cru, Poland) - Silence     Paintings: Oil on Canvas
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nuuro:

Kneeling Man Embracing a Standing Woman, Gustav Vigeland


Poetic
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morigrrl:

Hydrangea ‘snowfake’
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heeavyboots:

also the ocean on 35mm steals my heart (even more than it usually does)
heeavyboots:

also the ocean on 35mm steals my heart (even more than it usually does)
heeavyboots:

also the ocean on 35mm steals my heart (even more than it usually does)
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wonderlandtattoospdx:

Quyen Dinh flash tattooed by Alice Kendall!  

Digging the classic